Vous êtes ici : Accueil > Linguistique
  • Linguistique

    • Version imprimable de cet article
    • Agrandir le texte
    • Restaurer la taille normale
    • Réduire la taille du texte
  • ENGLISH LINGUISTICS LINGUISTIQUE ANGLAISE

    Département des Etudes des Pays Anglophones

     (dernière mise à jour : le 17/9/18)

     

    English linguistics courses (undergraduate level) offered during the 1st semester, 2018-19 : 

    Cours de linguistique anglaise (niveau licence) proposés au 1er semestre, 2018-19 :

     

    Lexicology and Morphology / Lexicologie et morphologie (L2)

    Sociolinguistics / Sociolinguistique (L3)

    Comparative Syntax / Syntaxe comparée (L3)

     

    NB : click on course name to be redirected to the course description further below / cliquer sur le lien pour être redirigé vers le descriptif du cours.

     


     

    LINGUISTICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS /

    DESCRIPTIFS DES COURS DE LINGUISTIQUE

     

    INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (L1S2)

    Apogée code : EL22LINC

    Level : Bachelor 1 (Licence 1)

    Semester : 2

    Instructors for 2018-19 (2nd semester) : 

    Schedule : TBA

     

    Description

    How is possible that you can speak your language so well yet struggle with learning other languages ? Why is a baby apparently able to learn any language in the world perfectly yet as adults if is so difficult ? How is that you know, just be feeling, that something is correct or incorrect in a language that you speak ? How is it possible to distinguish the sounds that make up words when everyone speaks so differently ? How is it we understand each other when we speak about things that the person we speak to has never seen ? Where do languages come from ? How do they influence our societies ? Do different languages influence the way we think ?

     

    The list of questions that have yet to be answered about the nature of language is enormous. We still do not know the answers to these questions and finding the answers is the science of language, or simply linguistics. This course offers an introduction and overview of the field of language science and the questions it seeks to answer. The course will be mainly theoretical but since linguistics is an empirical science, certain tools and methods will be introduced as well. A familiarity with the tools and methods as well an understanding of the questions we seek to answer will form the basis of the linguistics curriculum in the DEPA.

     

    Aims

    By the end of the course, students will have a broad understanding of field of language science. Specifically, the students will

    a. have an theoretical understanding of some of the questions and problems the field addresses

    b. have some practical experience with some of the methods and tools used in the field

     

    Assessment

    Two in-class tests + homework assignments : 50% of the course grade

    Final exam : 50% of the course grade

     

    Prerequisites

    There are no prerequisites for this course

     

    Reading and Materials

    The course textbook is :

    Yule, George. 2010. The Study of Language. Cambridge : CUP.

    (earlier editions are also acceptable)

    Multiple copies are available in the library. It will be supplemented by other readings distributed in electronic format during the course. Other textbooks may also be recommended by the instructors.

     

    Students will also be required to download and install certain free programs (such as AntConc). A laptop is preferable but not required.

     


     

    Lexicology and Morphology : A contrastive approach (L2S3)

    Apogée code : EL23LINC

    Level : Bachelor 2 (Licence 2)

    Semester : 1

    Groups (1st semester) 2018-19 :

    For the room numbers, see the schedule/timetable on the DEPA website.

     

    Description

    This course is devoted to contrastive lexicology and morphology ; in particular, we will be comparing the linguistic systems of English and French at the level of both the lexicon and grammatical categories such as tense, aspect, and noun determination. By analysing the correspondence (or lack thereof) between lexemes (e.g. : beau-père // father-in-law vs stepfather ; owl // hibou vs chouette) or between grammatical categories (e.g. verbal aspect : il fume // he smokes vs he’s smoking), we will consider the differences in the way the world is “divided up” or conceptualized depending on the language. We will also examine how verbal and nominal categories are structured in English and in French. The analysis of usage will be based on a corpus of translated texts. Data from other languages may also be included.

     

    Aims

    - Understand the similarities and differences between the morphological categories of English and French.

    - Understand differences between languages in lexical conceptualization.

    - Understand the linguistic aspects of translation (English/French) through the study of translated texts. 

     

    Assessment

    2-3 in-class tests/exams

     

    Prerequisites

    Introduction to Linguistics (L1)

     

    Bibliography

    Chuquet, H. & Paillard, M. 1987. Approches linguistiques des problèmes de traduction. Paris : Ophrys.

    Denis, D. & Sancier-Chateau, A. 1994. Grammaire du français. Paris : Librairie Générale Française.

    Jakobson, Roman. 1959. "On Linguistic Aspects of Translation", in R. A. Brower, ed., On Translation, Cambridge (Massachusetts), Harvard University Press, 232-239.

    Larreya, P. & Riviere, C. 2010. Grammaire explicative de l’anglais. Quatrième édition. Montreuil : Pearson.

    Paillard, M. 2000. Lexicologie contrastive anglais-français, formation des mots et Construction du sens. Paris : Ophrys.

    Riegel, M., et al. 1994. Grammaire méthodique du français. Paris : PUF.

    Tournier, J. 1993. Précis de lexicologie anglaise. Paris : Nathan.

    Van Roey, J. 1990. French-English Lexicology. An introduction, Leuven : Peeters.

     

    Other references will be provided in class.

     

    Lexicologie et morphologie : une approche contrastive (L2S3)

    Code Apogée : EL23LINC

    Niveau : Licence 2

    Semestre : 1

    Groupes (1er semestre) 2018-19 : 

    Pour les salles, voir l’emploi du temps sur le site du DEPA.

     

    Descriptif

    Ce cours est consacré à la lexicologie et à la morphologie contrastives, en particulier à la comparaison des systèmes linguistiques de l’anglais et du français au niveau du lexique et des traits grammaticaux tels que temps, aspect et détermination nominale. Nous examinerons les différences de “découpage” du monde réel selon les langues, en posant le problème de (non-)correspondance entre lexèmes (par exemple : beau-père // father-in-law vs stepfather  ; owl // hibou vs chouette) ou entre traits grammaticaux (par exemple, l’aspect verbal : il fume // he smokes vs he’s smoking). Nous montrons comment ces catégories se structurent en anglais et en français. L’analyse sera principalement basée sur un corpus de textes traduits. D’autres langues pourront également être abordées.

     

    Objectifs

    - Comprendre les différences et similitudes entre les catégories morphologiques de l’anglais et du français.

    - Comprendre les différences de découpage lexicologique entre les langues.

    - Comprendre les enjeux linguistiques de la traduction (anglais/français) par le biais de l’étude d’un corpus de textes traduits.

     

    Evaluation

    2 à 3 devoirs sur table

     

    Prérequis

    Introduction à la Linguistique (L1)

     

    Bibliographie

    Chuquet, H. & Paillard, M. 1987. Approches linguistiques des problèmes de traduction. Paris : Ophrys.

    Denis, D. & Sancier-Chateau, A. 1994. Grammaire du français. Paris : Librairie Générale Française.

    Larreya, P. & Riviere, C. 2010. Grammaire explicative de l’anglais. Quatrième édition. Montreuil : Pearson.

    Paillard, M. 2000. Lexicologie contrastive anglais-français, formation des mots et Construction du sens. Paris : Ophrys.

    Riegel, M., et al. 1994. Grammaire méthodique du français. Paris : PUF.

    Tournier, J. 1993, Précis de lexicologie anglaise. Paris : Nathan.

    Van Roey, J. 1990. French-English Lexicology. An introduction, Leuven : Peeters.

     

    D’autres références seront données au cours du semestre.

     

     


     

    Semantics and Pragmatics (L2S4)

    Code Apogée : EL24LSPC

    Level : Bachelor (Licence 2)

    Semester : 2 

    Instructors for 2018-19 (2nd semester) :

    Schedule : TBA

        

    Description

    How do we understand each other ? How do we know what words mean ? How do we shape the experienced world ? Meaning, or the symbolic representation of thought, is arguably fundamental not only to language but to all human society and civilisation. Semantics, is the scientific study of the structure of meaning in langauge. Where semantics focuses on the meaning in our mind, pragmatics turns to how we use that meaning inter-personally. Instead of a conceptual structure, meaning is understood as a device, a communicative tool. This course examines the different ways that linguists try to answer fundamental questions in semantics and pragmatics. Rather than focusing on the theories, the course seeks to encourage the students to ask questions themselves about how meaning is structured and how that structure is employed. To these ends, the course asks the students to preform their own analyses and collect their own data.

     

    Objectives

    At the end of the course, the students will have

    (i) an overall understanding of the fundamental theoretical problems and theories of semantics

    (ii) an overall understanding of the fundamental theoretical problems and theories of pragmatics

    (ii) practical experience in collocation and feature analysis of semantic structures

    (iv) practical experience in the use of electronic corpora for semantic analysis

     

    Prerequisites

    Introduction to Linguistics (L1)

    Lexicology and Morphology (L2)

     

    Assessment

    25% - Test, during the semester

    25% - Test, during the exam period

    50% - Project, submitted at the end of the course

     

    Reading

    A reader will be compiled and supplied at the beginning of course.

    It will be in electronic format.

      

     


     

    Diachronic Linguistics (L2S4)

    History of the English language

    Apogée code : EL24LINC

    Level : Bachelor 2 (Licence 2)

    Semester : 2

    Instructor : Lilli Parrott, lparrott@univ-paris8.fr

    Schedule 2018-19 (2nd semester) : TBA

     

    Description

    In this course we will study the history of the English language, from its Anglo-Saxon origins up through the modern period. Rather than following a strictly chronological approach, we will focus on certain major changes that have had a significant impact on English, e.g. lexical borrowing (especially from Old Norse & French), loss of the 2nd-singular pronoun thou, evolution of the verbal system (modals, aspectual distinctions, auxiliary usage, etc.), the Great Vowel Shift, etc. Through the study of these developments, we will gain insight into the different mechanisms underlying language change in general.

     

    Aims

    – learn how English has changed throughout its history

    – understand the mechanisms of language change

     

    Assessment

    2 short in-class tests + 1 final exam

     

    Prerequisites

    Introduction to linguistics

    Lexicology and Morphology

     

    Bibliography

     

    BARBER, C., BEAL, J. C., & SHAW, P. A. 2009. The English Language : A Historical Introduction. 2nd edition. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press.

    BRINTON, L. J., & ARNOVICK, L. K. 2017. The English Language. A Linguistic History. 3rd edition. Oxford : Oxford University Press. 

     

    NB : A detailed bibliography will be provided on the course website.

     


     

    Sociolinguistics (L3S5)

    Code Apogée : EL25LINC

    Level : Bachelor (L3) & Master (M1/2)

    Semester : 1

    Groups (1st semester) 2018-19 :

    Tuesday 12-3pm (sociolinguistics + corpus) : Guillaume Desagulier, gdesagulier@univ-paris8.fr 

    Thursday 3-6pm (sociolinguistics + questionnaires) : Dylan Glynn, dsg.up8@gmail.com

     

    See the DEPA schedule/timetable for room numbers.

     

    Description

    Language and the society it encodes are entirely entwined. Firstly, language is as varied as the society that produces it. In simple descriptive terms, an accurate picture of language, or a “grammar”, must be sensitive to this variation. How can we scientifically include the effects of social variation on linguistic structure in its description ? Secondly, language is a social vehicle and instrument of social expression which can, therefore, be studied as the basis for understanding society per se. Can we identify hidden structures in our society through such analysis ? By revealing these structures, can we improve our society ? This course is concerned with each aspect, both the Variationist Linguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis. The course will have a practical component, and students will be required to submit individual original projects. 

     

    Aims

    At the end of the course, the students will

    - be aware of many of the social structures that determine language structure

    - be aware of many of the language structures that determine social structure

    - have experience developing and working with questionnaires to perform elicitation research

    - have experience working with and extracting data from corpora

    - have rudimentary notions of statistics for linguistics

     

    Assessment

    Midterm exam + individual project submitted at the end of the semester.

     

    Prerequisites

    Introduction to Linguistics (L1)

    Lexicology and Morphology (L2)

    Semantics and Pragmatics (L2)

     

    Reading and Materials

    The students will need access to a personal computer. A laptop is preferred but not necessary.

    The cross-platform and free program AntConc is needed. Access to the program Microsoft Excel is also needed.

    A compiled reader in electronic format will be made available at the start of the course. 

     

     


     

    Comparative Syntax (L3S5)

    Code Apogée : EL25ALTC

    Level : Bachelor 3 (Min. Ens. & Trad.) / Master 1/2 

    Semester : 1

    One group in 2018-19 (1st semester) :

    Thursday 9-12, Yves Malinier, yves-bernard.malinier@univ-paris8.fr

     

    For the room number, see the schedule/timetable on the DEPA website.

     

    Description

    In the process of translating, we establish relationships between specific manifestations of two different linguistic systems (English and French), one which has already been expressed and the other which is still potential and adaptable.

    This EC is devoted to a linguistic and syntactic approach to translating with particular emphasis on word order (foregrounding, topicalisation, focusing, etc) and the study of passive, causative and English resultative constructions.

    Various extracts from parallel corpora will be dealt with and different methods of translation (modulation, transposition, equivalence, etc) will be exemplified throughout the semester.

    This course is designed for students specialising in translation and teaching.

     

    Aims

    - To learn about the structural & linguistic systems that are peculiar to each language by studying the most frequent translation procedures

    - To learn about the linguistic aspects of translation (English/French) and learn how to do a linguistic analysis of translation 

     

    Assessment

    2 in-class tests (week 6 & week 12)

     

    Prerequisites 

    Introduction to linguistics (L1)

    Lexicology and Morphology (L2)

     

    Reading

    Chuquet, H. et Paillard, M., 1987, Approches inguistiques des problèmes de traduction, Paris : Ophrys.

    Garnier, G., 1985, Linguistique et Traduction. Caen : Paradigme.

    Guillemin-Flescher, J., 1981, Syntaxe comparée du français et de l’anglais, Problèmes de traduction, Paris : Ophrys.

    Szlamowicz, J., 2011, Outils pour le commentaire de traduction, Paris : Ophrys.

    Vinay, J-P. et Darbelnet, J., 1995, Comparative Stylistics of French and English, Amsterdam : John Benjamins.

     

     

    Syntaxe comparée

    Code Apogée : EL25ALTC

    Niveau : Licence 3 (Min. Ens. & Trad.) / Master 1/2 

    Semestre : 1

    Un groupe en 2018-19 (1er semestre) :

    jeudi 9h-12h, Yves Malinier, yves-bernard.malinier@univ-paris8.fr

     

    Voir l’emploi du temps du DEPA pour le numéro de la salle.

     

    Descriptif

    Ce cours est consacré à l’étude des problèmes linguistiques que pose le passage de l’anglais au français et des différences d’agencement syntaxique entre ces deux langues. L’analyse se fera à partir d’extraits de textes traduits et des exercices d’application seront proposés afin de mieux comprendre ces différences d’ajustement. S’agissant de l’ordre des mots, on s’intéressera aux questions de ré-élaboration, de déplacement et de thématisation. Seront ainsi notamment traités les problèmes posés par les traductions anglaises du ON français et par les structures résultatives de l’anglais.

    Ce cours est destiné tout particulièrement aux étudiants engagés dans les parcours Traduction et Enseignement et souhaitant s’inscrire en Master 1 Traduction ou MEEF (préparation CAPES externe d’Anglais). 

     

    Objectifs

    - Se familiariser avec les systèmes structuraux et linguistiques propres à chaque langue à travers les procédés de traduction les plus fréquents (équivalence, modulation, transposition, etc)

    - Comprendre les enjeux linguistiques de la traduction (anglais/français), savoir mener une analyse linguistique de la traduction (Masters Traduction et Enseignement MEEF, préparation CAPES)

     

    Evaluation

    2 devoirs sur table (semaines 6 et 12)

     

    Prérequis 

    Introduction à la linguistique (L1)

    Lexicologie et Morphologie (L2)

     

    Bibliographie (** = lecture indispensable) 

    - Chuquet, H et Paillard, M., 1987, Approches linguistiques des problèmes de traduction, Paris, Ophrys

    **- Garnier, G., 1985, Linguistique et Traduction, Caen, Paradigme

    **- Vinay, J-P and Darbelnet, J., 1995, Comparative Stylistics of French and English, Amsterdam, John Benjamins

      


     

    Discourse Analysis (L3S6)

    Apogée code : EL26LINC

    Level : Bachelor 3 (L3) / Master (M1/2)

    Semester : 2

    Instructors for 2018-19 (2nd semester) : 

    Schedule : TBA

      

    Description

    This course provides an overview of discourse analysis in a theoretical and practical approach. We will examine the different theories to tackle the issue of the particular status of discourse analysis in linguistics. As it builds a bridge with other social sciences and humanities, discourse analysis falls into a very large field we will try to delimit. The analysis of political discourse, media discourse or advertisement for instance, shows complex linguistic phenomena, which can be analyzed with a series of linguistic tools. Students will be encouraged to collect and analyze their own data se. They will work on the notion of « discursive genre » so as to describe the features of language which interact with the context (sociological, institutional, ideological, etc …).

     

    Aims :

    - understand the role of discourse analysis in linguistics, 

    - learn how to use linguistic tools to analyze discourse(s),

    - understand the role of (inter)subjectivity and interlocution in meaning construction,

    - learn to make a distinction between textual genres,

    - collect personal data set.

     

    Evaluation : 2 in-class exams and a personal project

     

    Prerequisites : basic notions of linguistics

     

    Reading : 

    Fairclough, N. (1992, 2008), Discourse and Social Change Cambridge : Polity Press.

    Gee, J. P. (2014), An Introduction to Discourse Analysis : Theory and Method.New York : Routledge.

    Johnstone, B. (2008), Discourse Analysis (2nd ed.). Oxford : Blackwell.

    Jones, R. (2012), Discourse Analysis. Abingdon : Routledge.

    Kerbrat-Orecchioni, C. (2001), Les actes de langage dans le discours. Paris : Nathan.

    Maingueneau, D. (2014), Discours et analyse du discours – Introduction. Armand Colin.

    Maingueneau D. & Charaudeau P. (eds.) (2002), Dictionnaire d’analyse du discours. Paris : Seuil.

     

    Analyse du discours (L3S6)

    Code Apogée : EL26LINC

    Niveau : Licence (L3) / Master (M1/2)

    Semestre : 2

    Enseignants 2018-19 (2ème semestre) : 

    Les horaires seront affichés ultérieurement.

     

    Descriptif 

    Ce cours est consacré à l’analyse du discours à la fois dans sa dimension théorique et pratique. Nous examinerons les différentes théories (francophones et anglophones) en soulevant le statut particulier de l’analyse du discours dans le domaine de la linguistique. En constituant un pont avec les autres sciences sociales ou « humanités », l’analyse du discours s’inscrit dans un champ très large qu’il conviendra de définir. L’analyse du discours politique, des médias ou de la publicité, par exemple, permet de comprendre la complexité des mécanismes linguistiques mis en jeu dans ces discours grâce à différentes méthodes d’analyse. Il s’agira donc pour chaque étudiant d’élaborer un corpus (recueil de données) en travaillant sur la notion de « genre discursif » de façon à décrire des formes langagière en interaction avec leurs contextes au sens large (sociologique, institutionnel, idéologique, etc.).

     

    Objectifs

    - comprendre la place de l’analyse du discours en linguistique,

    - apprendre à manier les outils linguistiques pour analyser des discours (au sens large),

    - comprendre la place de l’ (inter)subjectivité et de l’interlocution dans la construction du sens,

    - distinguer différents genres de discours,

    - élaborer un corpus personnel.

     

    Evaluation : 2 devoirs sur table et un projet personnel 

     

    Prérequis : Connaissances des bases de la linguistique

     

    Bibliographie

    Fairclough, N. (1992, 2008), Discourse and Social Change Cambridge : Polity Press.

    Gee, J. P. (2014), An Introduction to Discourse Analysis : Theory and Method.New York : Routledge.

    Johnstone, B. (2008), Discourse Analysis (2nd ed.). Oxford : Blackwell.

    Jones, R. (2012), Discourse Analysis. Abingdon : Routledge.

    Kerbrat-Orecchioni, C. (2001), Les actes de langage dans le discours. Paris : Nathan.

    Maingueneau, D. (2014), Discours et analyse du discours – Introduction. Armand Colin.

    Maingueneau D. et Charaudeau P. (dir.) (2002), Dictionnaire d’analyse du discours. Paris : Seuil.

     


     

    Syntaxe fonctionnelle (L3S6)

    Niveau : Licence(L3) et Master (M1/M2)

    Semestre : 2

     

    Descriptif et objectifs du cours :

    Ce cours se propose d’étudier, à travers les modes de présentation de l’information

    1) l’organisation interne des constituants de la phrase en anglais actuel, les différents rôles actanciels régissant la définition sémantique des procès et les schémas non-canoniques issus de la re-distribution syntaxique des différents constituants de la phrase, notamment à travers l’opération de passivation et la construction activo-passive.

    2) les notions de transitivité et de complémentation par le biais des ajouts et termes servant à clôturer la phrase ou l’énoncé. La grammaire traditionnelle/scolaire sera re-visitée afin de préciser la distinction, la frontière entre complément et circonstant. 

    Ce cours s’adresse plus particulièrement aux étudiants des Mineures Traduction et Enseignement.

     

    Evaluation :
    2 devoirs sur table (semaines 6 et 12, 50% chacun)

     

    Bibliographie :

    Delmas, C (éd.), 2006, Complétude, cognition, construction linguistique, Presses de la Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris

    Dixon, R. and Aikhenvald, A. (eds), 2006, Complementation : a Cross-linguistic Typology, OUP, Oxford and New York

    Goldberg, A., 2001, "The pragmatics of obligatory adjuncts", in Language, Journal of the Linguistic Society of America, volume 77, number 4, USA

    Groussier, M-L., 1997, "Vers une définition de la transitivité en anglais et en français", in Cahiers Charles V, 23, Université Paris 7, Paris

    Lemmens, M., 1998, Lexical Perspectives on Transitivity and Ergativity, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia

    Lyngfelt, B. and Solstad, T. (eds.), 2006, Demoting the Agent : Passive, middle and other voice phenomena, John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia

    Touratier, C., 2001, "La notion de circonstant", in Travaux du Cercle Linguistique d’Aix-en-Provence, 17, Publications de Université de Provence

     

     

    (last updated on September 17, 2018)

     

     

     

     

     

    • {id_article=#ENV{id_article}}
    • Version imprimable de cet article
    • Agrandir le texte
    • Restaurer la taille normale
    • Réduire la taille du texte
    • retour en haut de la page